Fuck Yeah Monkey

Welcome to Fuck Yeah Monkey a Tumblr by Myles Braithwaite about Monkeys. We have Old and New World Monkeys.

~ Wednesday, June 8 ~
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kian-sama asked: This blog makes me so happy.

Thanks.


~ Wednesday, January 19 ~
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animalworld:

RHESUS MACQUE or RHESUS MONKEY Mom and Baby (Macaca mulatta)
From the series “Clever Monkeys” on KUED.org
The Rhesus Macaque, also called the Rhesus Monkey, is one of the best known species of Old World monkeys.
It is listed as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and its tolerance of a broad range of habitats
They are regular swimmers.
Babies as young as a few days old can swim, and adults are known to swim over a half mile between islands, but are often found drowned in small groups where their drinking waters lie.
Rhesus macaques are noted for their tendency to move from rural to urban areas, coming to rely on handouts or refuse from humans.
They have become a pest in some areas, perceived as a possible risk to public health and safety.
The Rhesus macaque is well known to science owing to its relatively easy upkeep in captivity, and has been used extensively in medical and biological research.
It has given its name to the Rhesus factor, one of the elements of a person’s blood group (Rh Positive or Negative)
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhesus_MacaqueOther Photos you might like:Squirrel Monkeys Riding a CapybaraRed Titi MonkeyNursing Japanese Macaque/Snow MonkeyDeBrazza Monkey & Baby

animalworld:

RHESUS MACQUE or RHESUS MONKEY Mom and Baby (Macaca mulatta)

From the series “Clever Monkeys” on KUED.org

  • The Rhesus Macaque, also called the Rhesus Monkey, is one of the best known species of Old World monkeys.
  • It is listed as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and its tolerance of a broad range of habitats
  • They are regular swimmers.
  • Babies as young as a few days old can swim, and adults are known to swim over a half mile between islands, but are often found drowned in small groups where their drinking waters lie.
  • Rhesus macaques are noted for their tendency to move from rural to urban areas, coming to rely on handouts or refuse from humans.
  • They have become a pest in some areas, perceived as a possible risk to public health and safety.
  • The Rhesus macaque is well known to science owing to its relatively easy upkeep in captivity, and has been used extensively in medical and biological research.
  • It has given its name to the Rhesus factor, one of the elements of a person’s blood group (Rh Positive or Negative)


Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhesus_Macaque

Other Photos you might like:

Squirrel Monkeys Riding a Capybara

Red Titi Monkey

Nursing Japanese Macaque/Snow Monkey

DeBrazza Monkey & Baby

Tags: Rhesus Macque Macaque Old World
19 notes
reblogged via animalworld
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kristinhoppe:

He’s so fluffy, I could DIE.

kristinhoppe:

He’s so fluffy, I could DIE.

Tags: Snub-nosed monkey Old World China
17 notes
reblogged via kristinhoppe
~ Tuesday, December 7 ~
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landscapelifescape:

Young Japanese Macaque at Jigokudani hotspring in the mountains near Nagano, Honshu, Japan. 
Smiling Punk by Harry Eggens

landscapelifescape:

Young Japanese Macaque at Jigokudani hotspring in the mountains near Nagano, Honshu, Japan.

Smiling Punk by Harry Eggens

Tags: Macaque Old World Japan Japanese Macaqu Jigokudani Hotspring
149 notes
reblogged via landscapelifescape
~ Saturday, November 27 ~
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nationalgeographicmagazine:

Snow Monkeys
Photo and caption by Mary-Lou EmmertSnow Monkeys bathing in the hot springs in Jigokudani Japan A person is simply awe-struck watching the monkeys going about their daily lives. The youngsters playing, the adults socializing and de-lousing one another. Resting, holding onto the sides of the pool.Part of 2010 National Geographic Photography Contest Galleries | Nature Gallery—Week 8

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Snow Monkeys
Photo and caption by Mary-Lou Emmert
Snow Monkeys bathing in the hot springs in Jigokudani Japan A person is simply awe-struck watching the monkeys going about their daily lives. The youngsters playing, the adults socializing and de-lousing one another. Resting, holding onto the sides of the pool.
Part of 2010 National Geographic Photography Contest Galleries | Nature Gallery—Week 8

Tags: Jigokudani Japan Old World Snow Monkeys
175 notes
reblogged via nationalgeographicmagazine
~ Tuesday, November 2 ~
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A Baby Gorilla at the San Francisco Zoo. (via freevo)

A Baby Gorilla at the San Francisco Zoo. (via freevo)

Tags: San Francisco Zoo Baby Gorilla Old World
6 notes
reblogged via freevo
~ Tuesday, September 28 ~
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They live in groups of 11-64, typically 1 male:multi-female, but occasionally multimale:multifemale. They have a home range of 200-1200ha. Hanuman langurs spend up to 80 per cent of their time on the ground, although they will also spend time in the trees. They are diurnal and move quadrupedally. When a new male takes over a troop, he systematically kills all the infants sired by the previous alpha male.
— Langur Behaviour via BBC’s Wildfacts.
Tags: Behaviour Langur Old World
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A Hunuman Langur in Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India.

A Hunuman Langur in Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India.

Tags: Gray Langur Langur Rishikesh Dehradun India Uttarakhand Old World
17 notes
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The Hanuman Langur (Semnopitheaus entellus) is adapted to eating tough food which others find indigestible. They can even eat seeds with high levels of the toxins like strychnine (Strychnos nox-vomica) and distasteful vegetation avoided by other creatures. They feed mainly on leaves and other vegetation but also search the ground for fallen fruit and nuts. They also snack on insects, fungi and tree gum. They may even eat soil or stones, probably for minerals to help detoxify their food. They are thus found in a wide range of habitats from the plains to forests.
Hanuman langurs by Chuck Smith of Cabrillo College.
Tags: Langur Hanuman Langur New World Diet
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  Delhi authorities are to deploy a contingent of langurs — a large type of monkey — at Commonwealth Games venues to help chase away smaller simians from the sporting extravaganza.
  
  From Wednesday, 10 langurs will be put on duty outside Games venues in the Indian capital, with the boxing and hockey stadiums seen as particularly vulnerable to monkey misbehaviour, an official said.
  
  The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) has a regular team of 28 langurs which are used to scare away their weaker brethren in VIP areas of the city, but 10 more have been brought in from the neighbouring state of Rajasthan.
  
  Four of them will be posted outside the boxing complex with their handlers, while another four will patrol the hockey complex. Two have been kept in reserve to respond in the event of an emergency.


Delhi deploys ‘super monkeys’ for Games security by Daily Nation.

Delhi authorities are to deploy a contingent of langurs — a large type of monkey — at Commonwealth Games venues to help chase away smaller simians from the sporting extravaganza.

From Wednesday, 10 langurs will be put on duty outside Games venues in the Indian capital, with the boxing and hockey stadiums seen as particularly vulnerable to monkey misbehaviour, an official said.

The New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) has a regular team of 28 langurs which are used to scare away their weaker brethren in VIP areas of the city, but 10 more have been brought in from the neighbouring state of Rajasthan.

Four of them will be posted outside the boxing complex with their handlers, while another four will patrol the hockey complex. Two have been kept in reserve to respond in the event of an emergency.

Delhi deploys ‘super monkeys’ for Games security by Daily Nation.

Tags: Commonwealth Games Gray Langurs Hanuman Langurs India Langurs Old World South Asia Langur